Friday Fave: Cartozia Tales

Obviously Cartographers belong in the same category as other superheroes like Superman, Batman, and Spiderman and we finally have a our own comic book to prove it.

Cartozia Tales is a collaborative effort of nine indy artists with two guest artist each issue.

Cartozia

They have an interesting plan, they’ve split the world into nine regions (what’s the name for the ninth of an area, nona-rant?) and the artist will tell a story from a different region each issue. They may build off the region’s story from the previous issue, continue on the story they told the previous issue, and start something fresh.

After being funded by a KickStarter campaign, they’ve shipped three issues already and have at least seven more promised. Think the project definitely deserve’s a look.

Friday Fave: Public Workout Maps

When I first found out about GIS, the first application that came to mind was using it to map my running routes. At that time, I was using paper maps and scraps of paper to measure how far I was running each day. GIS obviously offered a better method.

Almost twenty years later, GPS has become so common place that I think we have four or five devices in our household that have GPS capabilities and measuring my runs has become ridiculously simple.

Given that background, you can understand why I love projects like this project by Nikita Barsukov, who compiled publicly available data from Endomondo and created maps of public running workout tracks for a variety of European Cities, including this sample from Helsinki.

helsinki
Barsukov.Net

Flowing Data, using a similar concept, generated similar maps for several cities in the United States, including Minneapolis–some areas I know.

http://flowingdata.com/2014/02/05/where-people-run/#jp-carousel-33732
http://flowingdata.com/2014/02/05/where-people-run/

I’ve got about six years of running data of my own that I should use to generate a personal running route map but would be a fun project.